Thursday, April 27, 2017

ARE THE STAKES AT MOC (MAINTENANCE OF CERTIFICATION) TOO HIGH TO GIVE UP?


Scandalous overreach by the proponents of Maintenance of Certification (MOC) invites investigation by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and by Internal Revenue Service (IRS). 

FTC should determine whether or not trade is being or is likely to be restricted by the tenets of MOC doctrine and its financial operatives. IRS, meanwhile, should examine whether or not the ABIM Foundation meets IRS 501(C)3 requirements. The question is whether or not there is reliable evidence that MOC revenue is being diverted into the pockets of selected individuals.

Many observers think that is the case and that the amount of money paid out in personal remunerations seems exorbitant. This finding forces the question, namely,  to what extent the ABIM Foundation is a charitable organization or a well heeled 501(c)3 enterprise. 

Here are some facts and figures:

The president & CEO of ABMS (American Board of Medical Specialties), according to IRS Form 990, received total compensation of $779,487 for tax year 2013;

The ABPN (American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology) CEO in 2012 received total compensation of $843,591 -- according to IRS Form 990 for that year;

The ABIM (American Board of Internal Medicine), schedule J, Form 990, for 2012, reports base compensation for the president-CEO as $628,952;  

Reported base compensation for Senior VP/COO, ABIM, was $464,747;

Base compensation for the Sr. VP/CIO, ABIM, was $382,092;

Base compensation for the Senior VP/COO,  ABIM, was $326,520;

Base compensation for Senior VP/CFO,  ABIM, was $452,630.

-- not too shabby especially when one keeps in mind that these figures do not include income from what IRS refers to as "related organizations". In order to see this additional money jockeying, just go to Schedule J, IRS Form 990, and look at lines i and ii -- add 'em up and weep. Not to worry. Increased fees down the road re MOC will take care of any shortfalls. 

Readers are invited to check out this data by looking up Form 990 information. We expect to add to this report from time to time so stay tuned.  These figures show why MOC will not be easily vanquished -- the stakes are too high.


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